News

  • 09/10/2019 - A team of researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign found that honey bees can remember positive and negative experiences—such as taking care of their young or fending off an enemy. These memories are then stored in specific areas of their brains, according to how good or bad the experience was. Scientists have long known that vertebrates—animals with tail bones—like ourselves are capable of storing memories of pleasure and pain in distinct brain areas such as this. However, this has never been documented before in the minds of bees. "We wanted to know whether bees, with a tiny brain, devote different parts of it to processing social information that is either negative or positive," Gene Robinson, an author of the study from Urbana-Champaign's Carl R. Woese Institute for Genomic Biology, told Newsweek.

  • 08/23/2019 - The Juvenile Detention Center Outreach program, conceived by neuroscience student Ian Traniello, has been running for five years. To date, roughly a dozen neuroscience students have participated, most of whom had never taught behind bars. Now, the JDC outreach team has been on several local panels discussing their outreach work, presented posters at the annual Society for Neuroscience Meeting, and had their work highlighted in Science.

  • 08/15/2019 - According to bee expert and University of Illinois professor Gene E. Robinson, urban environments like Chicago are actually great for bees.

  • 08/09/2019 - The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency will fund two projects for research on human performance optimization within United States war fighters at the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology.

  • 07/25/2019 - On Thursday, July 18th, the University of Illinois held "Illini Fest."  This first ever event, initiated by the Chief Marketing Officer, Eric Minor, was designed to showcase the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in Chicago.  It was a way to "wake up" the city of Chicago and announce to the over 150,000 + alumni in the Chicago area that the University of Illinois is here and is better than ever.

  • 07/25/2019 - Neuroscientist shines new light on a natural phenomenon:  The anemonefish is a gender-bending marvel.

  • 07/24/2019 - Beckman Institute - 07/24/19  Fatima Husain’s group has published one paper and has another forthcoming that measure the behavioral, functional, and structural changes associated with using mindful

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  • 06/20/2019 - Jonathan Sweedler was recently voted the 2019 winner of CASSS Award for Outstanding Achievements in Separation Science.

  • 05/16/2019 - ENTOMOLOGY:  WLS-TV (Chicago, May 16) – For the growing number of beekeepers in Lake County, the arrival of 3 million bees was a welcome sign

  • 05/02/2019 - 5G WIRELESS - Chicago Tribune (May 1) – 5G, the fifth generation of wireless, promises lightning-fast download speeds and could lay the foundation for high-tech advancements like self-driving cars,

  • 05/01/2019 - New soft, stretchable electronic devices designed by a team including Neuroscience faculty and alumni at Beckman Institute could change the way people undergo medical tests, control prosthetic devi

  • 04/17/2019 - Hakai Magazine (Campbell River, Canada, April 17) – Mark Hauber, an animal behavior researcher at the U. of I., has discovered that year after year a female common murre will produce an egg with a shell pattern that has an individualized, recognizable pattern that is nearly identical to her previous eggs by manipulating just two pigments.

  • 04/17/2019 - 3D printing is...allowing scientists to create models at a much finer scale, says ornithologist Mark Hauber at the University of Illinois in Urbana. Hauber studies a behavior known as brood parasitism, in which birds lay eggs in the nests of other species, leaving the unwitting foster parents to rear their chicks. Previously, researchers studied host birds’ reactions by placing plaster and wood models of parasitic eggs in their nests. But using 3D printing, Hauber’s team created far more realistic looking cowbird eggs, which allowed his team to examine whether variations of just a few millimeters in size influenced robins’ decisions to throw the parasitic eggs out of their nests.

  • 04/11/2019 - Featured in the April 10 Daily Illini, Aadeel Akhtar, founder of PSYONIC, is featured for the bionic hand he has been working on and is currently produced by PSYONIC.  He states, “Our prosthetic hand is actually faster, smaller and stronger than all the other prosthetic hands that are out there...